About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
CSPAN 13
MSNBCW 8
CSPAN2 5
KRCB (PBS) 3
WRC (NBC) 3
CNBC 2
CNNW 2
KQED (PBS) 2
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 44
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
. this looks that the impact on jobs and the economy. >> immigration. the average american wants to -- >> grace wiseman second place winners in the student cam, petition. their message look set a legal immigration and the impact on jobs in the u.s. economy. >> immigration, allowing people to enter our borders can be beneficial to immigrants and the rest of the country. >> when it comes to immigration, it is not right versus left, republican vs. democrat issue. it is those who have power to influence policy. and the average american heart regardless of political affiliation does want to see immigration laws enforced. amnesty. chris immigration laws. take up the highest unemployment rate right now is the young people. -- >> the highest and a plummet right now is the young people. the problem is is the way we have done it, they do not pay tax. you have to pay tax. and the employer would pay the tax. a ford are did not pay because it will not be here -- foreigner does not pay because they will not be here long. but we did not have the employer pay either. if the employer hires you, you will have to
each other's lives. it is of a free market economy that grants everyone a fair chance and an unfettered start in the race of life. it is of a voluntary civil society that strengthens our commuters, protects the vulnerable, and minds the gaps to make sure no one gets left behind. and it is of a just tolerance and sustainable federal government that protects and complements free enterprise and civil society rather than presuming to replace them. this vision will not realize itself. the left, the inertia of the status quo, and the entire economy of this city stand a raid against it. realizing it will sometimes require conservatives to take on entrenched interests and policies and political third rail. many of these will be interests traditionally aligned with and financially generous to establishments within both political parties become sometimes it will require us to stand up for those that no one else will. the unborn child in the womb, the poor student in the failing school, the reformed father of my wishing in prison, the single mom trapped in poverty, and the splintering neighborhood
that it doubles down on a dead end energy policy that's hurting our economy, hurting our environment and our health. burning fossil fuels is a primary cause of climate change, and we simply can't afford to continue down this destructive path. it makes far more sense to focus on developing the clean, renewable energy technologies that we all know we're going to need down the road. developing these technologies will create quality, long-term jobs that can't be shift overseas. it's good for business. it's good for our planet. it's good for our national security. there's no reason why we can't put aside our differences and take action to promote a clean energy future. it's what our constituents sent us here to do. our window of opportunity is rapidly closing. the time to act is now. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam
. part of it is the economy. improving economy in the united states tends to attract people as well. we just haven't seen that, but monitor those flms -- numbers. we have -- the thing that troubles me the most is the smugglers who do this for profit, who are taking creative routes either up through the bahamas, we're seeing haitians being run through puerto rico right now. so it's a constant battle as the smugglers get smarter and daring. they are smaller than the land border. >> the smuggler industry, for lack of a better term, is that on the increase, is that on the decrease? what's the trend? it's an recollection spencive undertaking. my understanding is they charge thousands of dollars per person they bring. is that something we've seen an increase in or decrease and if we've seen a decrease, is it because of economic factors? how do we stop these? it sounds like a fast boat through the middle of the caribbean is not something we would necessarily stop. >> i think flow of migrants, it's similar to the flow of drugs. people are very creative. yes, we've seen an increase in those peop
on fixing it. immigration reform is vital to securing our borders, just starting our economy, and ensuring for access to that great american dream. the current status quo on immigration makes no sense. we turn away people from entering the country who could create thousands of jobs and let people crossing our borders who take away jobs. r oach ibanced. the border securitystro,ut achi. the path to citizenship is tough, but it is accessible. yes, our bill does secure the border first, but it treats the situation of those living in the shadows as an equally urgent priority. this is by design. we believe that americans will support sensible solutions to dealing with the undocumented and future legal immigrants, but only if they are convinced there will not be future waves of illegal immigrants. when the 11 million come out of the shadows and it will not only improve their lives and their families' lives, it will strengthen our country and its economies. in fact, conservative economist douglas holtz beacon has found that immigration reform will save taxpayers $2.70 trillion a. we what this legi
-blooming self-starters. it's the latest chapter in his look at older workers in the american economy and all part of his on-going reporting "making sense of financial news." >> look at this nice, tight stomach with the abs which you could grate cheese on. >> reporter: at 55, judi henderson-townsend is working with a much younger crowd. >> it's like living in the land of dorian gray here. nobody ever ages. >> reporter: after a career spent working with stiffs in the corporate world, says townsend, she started mannequin madness. >> i sell mannequins, i rent mannequins, i repair mannequins, i blog about mannequins. here in our warehouse, we recycle them for the stores for free and then we resell them or rent them to other people. >> reporter: so you mean all those good looking folk back there were going to be dumped. >> those were going to be tossed into the landfill because the store didn't need them anymore. they're just maybe a few years old, but structurally nothing is wrong with them. it's like having a pre-owned lexus. >> reporter: townsend thinks she's modeling a trend: the rise of the m
, beat or miss estimates? as for the economy, here is today's calendar. >> how is the crowd sourcing experiment gone so far? i haven't looked at the results. >> the results for coming. >>? >> i can't even log in to the borrowing page. >> they've gotten some decent numbers that have come this. i think there are 1500 or 1700 -- >> but are they better -- >> they're good at it, but i think we have made the mistake of picking from predictable companies. that's why we started picking some trickier companies like apple. that's the one that's up in the air. nobody knows exactly what's going to happen. if you can beat on these companies, then we're going to be more impressed. >> apple generates a lot of attention and feedback. if i put out on twitter, will apple meet, beat or miss, some people will say it will meet, some will say it will miss and others will stay you stink, sullivan. >> but you will get responses by putting apple out there. >> anything you say on apple, and i'm an apple lifelong user, and i referenced a couple weeks ago that i was going to buy a windows 8 machine because it w
the economy. >> we ask what he would say. >> come see us in detroit, but there are a lot of great things happening here. .ome see what we are doing here >> many campaign promises were made. the most important should be the promised president obama made to himself. in for prestige or wanted to change the lives for the better. politics forinto prestige or wanting to change the lives for the better. the best way would be to change the people or communities the spur them to action. >> congratulations to all the winners. videos, andwinning studentcam.org. >> they say it is not perfect but it is a balance. the group is made up of senator mccain, rubio, d bennett. conference is 50 minutes. afternoon. we are here to announce that eight senators from opposite sides of the political aisle are coming together on a common sense immigration reform proposal we believe we can pass the senate. i want to thank my colleagues. each of us is strong-willed. each of us has differing beliefs, but if you would have seen that room in any of our meetings and seen anyone argue strongly but come together and realiz
is broken. it doesn't meet the needs of our economy and security. we need to move forward with this debate on how to make sure that our immigration system moving forward does meet the needs. >> i'm hearing it sounds like a lot of the things i heard after 9/11 which is that you think really what is broken here when we are talking about this specific case is interagency cooperation. >> we have made great strides over the last ten or 11 years making sure there is better cooperation and communication. more needs to be done. in the case of boston the two suspects we weren't able to track their movements, what they were doing and making sure that we had a handle on some of the folks that did have the opportunity or the proclivity to be involved in terrorism activities. >> if you watched yesterday some serious fireworks during the judiciary committee hearing. let me play that for folks. >> if you have ways to improve the bill, offer an amendment when we start mark up in may. i say that particularly those who are pointing to what happened, the terrible tragedy in boston as i would say an excuse fo
was not working. >> that's a good point. you thought maybe stand above all of the other lesser economies and the news did start to tighten. >> i thought it was the most important article in the paper. maybe they're breaking ranks [ bell ringing ] >> and his own jack lou? >> hard to tell. >> they are geniuses. >> i took economics, and i couldn't wait how long they were. >> there's the bell. s&p at the top of the screen. state street global advisers and blackstone celebrating the recent launch of the spider, senior loan etf. the texas independent producers and the royalty owners association doing the honors. you cannot start this market day, jim, without talking about netflix. a 25% move is a big move even on that name. >> that was a big short position. there was not a lot of stock that was out there. it's a very tight flow. >> a lot of people kept thinking that this is the quarter where we find that the bulge in new subscribers wasn't happening and there are other people who immediately point out, look, the cash flow is not that good and the 36 analysts who cover the stock only six are re
for the sequester, which is currently having and will have a very, very negative effect on our economy, on jobs, and on the confidence that americans have that we are pursuing rational policy. the the gentleman and i both have agreed that sequester is not a rational policy. it deals with high priority and low priority items in very much the same way. so my question, mr. leader, is there a possibility, not on the calendar, you didn't announc it, bui w you that we go to conference, preferably, the first day we are back, after this weekend, so that we could get to work on trying to get to an agreement on one of the most pressing problems in front of this country, and that's getting ourselves on a fiscally sustainable path. i yield to my friend. mr. cantor: i thank the gentleman. i appreciate the spirit with which he recommends that we proceed along the lines of those individuals that he spoke about had asked for. and i would say to the gentleman, mr. speaker, that i'm told that our chairman and the chairman on the other side of the capitol, ms. murry, they are meeting and looking to see the path f
% of poll, only americans think that control is an important problem mostly economy in general, 24% think that is most important. federal budget deficit and federal debt is 11%. here is the front page of "the new york daily news," -- lindsay is an independent here in washington d.c.. you are on "washington journal." am really sad and i want to make sure if one does in this country that 31,000 people per year are killed by guns. this is a normal and we did this is a horrible number for its allies civilization. horrible number for a civilization. stronger gun laws can make a difference. calling in.you for this is the front page of " the washington times." michael is from rockville center, new york. caller: the reason this legislation failed is not only would it have not prevented the terrible tragedy that occurred in connecticut but also the tragedy in colorado. abroad is lacking because it would appear both parties have used this issue to raise money and at the same time not really address it responsibly. i think most americans are on to the fact that would appear you bringin -- that what
on "starting point." ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. i work for 47 different companies. well, technically i work for one. that company, the united states postal service® works for thousands of home businesses. because at usps.com® you can pay, print and have your packages picked up for free. i can even drop off free boxes. i wear a lot of hats. well, technically i wear one. the u.s. postal service®, no business too small. >>> welcome back to "starting point," "minding your business" this morning. stock futures pointing to higher open. it would be a rebound from big losses last week. dow up and opens for real in two hours. $333 million. that's one estimate of how much it cost to shut down boston for the die. the area produces $325 billion worth of goods and services every year. that's a little less than a billion dollars a day. the ninth largest gdp in the country and friday everything stopped. businesses, public transit, colleges, shopping centers shut. now many people were at home. but others could
the economy grow and create jobs, protect the middle class, and protect seen yours. the president is engaged in a process with lawmakers where he's trying to find commonground to see if commonground exists with republicans around the basic principle to reduce the budget in a balanced way, and he's put forward a plan that would do that eliminating the sequester in the process. when it comes to delays, though, congress has to act in order to avert delays. >> prioritizing spending under the faa, but you want the sequester to inflict maximum -- >> since we did everything we could to avert the sequester, and, unfortunately, the republicans decided as a political matter it was a home run for them to inflick this upon the american people, i think that suggestion just doesn't hold water. secondly, the faa did take action, all the action it could under the law to produce savings and avoid furloughs up until this point where because of the nature of their budget and the personnel heavy nature of their operation furloughs are the only option available to the faa at this time. again, if congress wants t
. it begins to affect the economies in the area. certainly within the district i represent. yet there's always a persistent demand for more. the persistent demand usually comes from washington and not the border communities that they want more. some of those communities are the safest in the country. but the fact remains that if we are going to make security the linchpin and put dollars on top of dollars, taxpayer money, and there's a lack of transparency and oversight, i am not sure that this is not just become another symbolic gesture and the outcome continues to be one that is in doubt and people keep demanding more. host: for yourself representing a border state, as co-chairman of the progressive caucus, if any legislation that comes to be in the house and senate include border security as the linchpin to a pathway to citizenship, the border has to be secure before the 11 million people can get on a pathway to citizenship, if that's the case, are you a yes vote? guest: no. arbitrary triggers should not be part of the legislation. it's my understanding that there been a time of three years
dangers within our economy. one would be interest rates rising. i asked this to people i consider to be smart, big bankers, nature capital centers of the world. can they control just raising keep interest rates below? is there a point at which the central cannot keep pace. interest rate to 7% are when i was a kid, 19% were 21% would be catastrophic with this burden of debt. he seems to work right now, but there is a certain allusion of wealth in the stock market and evolution of the peace we can manage our debt. those are my concerns and because of that, we have to do long-range things. i propose several things since i've come. i propose fixing a security problem. to me it's an actuarial problem. you raise the age gradually 27862 thirds of the social security deficit. fix the remaining by testing the benefits. the president has occasionally sad he's for entitlement reform, but is not shown much leadership on this premise seems to benchmark per se, but any with him at least a 47 republican senators, we sat around a table that he and the vice president a year and half ago and i told
's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the chechen-american teenager accused in the boston marathon bombings now faces a possible death sentence. the filing of charges today officially moved the case into the federal courts, even as the city began returning to normal. dzhokhar tsarnaev was arraigned this morning, at boston's beth israel deaconess hospital, where he remained in serious condition. a short time later came word of the complaint, filed by the u.s. justice department. it formally charged the 19-year- old with conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction, potentially, a capital crime,
economy? >> very often we have a bigger impact with the congregation by talking to them about do you want to save money on your energy bill? and very seldom does the congregati say oh no. they usually say yes, how do we do that? >> the number of houses of worship that belong to ipl combine their purchasing power to buy cheaper electricity from renewable energy, at rates which can amount to huge savings, especially for the larger churches. ipl also encourages utilizing renewable energy like the solar panels on the roof of the shalom synagogue. >> we have saved many thousands of dollars over the course of 11 years running this building, because of passive solar technology. because of sensitive lightings that we put in place. it absolutely keeps operating costs down. if you make an investment in something like a really efficient boiler, it makes a tremendous difference. >> we're asking our congregations to serve as examples to the community. and then the hope is that when the religious leader can tell his or her congregation that they're saving money on energy, that people will say, i'll go
or entity that recognized the importance of preventing further deterioration in the local economy and agreed to take responsibility for the effort to turn things around. the leader help facilitate collaboration which was essential not only because economic development is complicated and multidimensional but also for them more mossadegh reasoned that outside funders would require that all interested stakeholders commit to a strategic direction. the specific avenues to recover. among their cities identified in the boston study. some built on traditional strengths while others created new businesses from scratch. for example grand rapids michigan once known for its furniture manufacturing work to become a major medical center partnering with michigan state university in grand valley state universities to form the research center. similarly as in jersey city has successfully transformed itself from a manufacturing-based economy to a financial center. its proximity to new york city makes this transformation seem obvious in hindsight but other similarly situated cities have not made comparable str
. the red cross isn't currently accepting donations but economy the city of boston have set up websites with resources. if you see anything suspicious let us know on our facebook page. >>> we have some breaking news. firefighters rescued one person from a burning home in arlington. the pyre broke out around 10:30 this morning. the 2300 block of north dinwiddie street in arlington. the home was fully engulfed when they arrived. they pulled one person from the basement. two people were taken to the hospital with burn injuries. no word on their condition. we have a crew on the way and will bring you the latest information as soon as we get it. >>> it is 11:27 thousand. coming up in the next half hour, "news4 midday," under watchful eyes, d.c.'s emancipation parade is under way at this hour. news4's megan mcgrath is along the parade route with how police are keeping the city safe in light of the boston bombing. >>> lawmakers are at work this morning. we will have the latest on where gun control measures and an immigration reform bill stand at this hour. >> storm team 4 meat meet tom kierein
that people view as specific predictors of where the economy is going. and again, you can see while it did go down in august of 2012, we've essentially had six straight months of either flat or up and then we had a down. and, again, we would normally want to see something like three months of a trend before we made too much of this. but the fact is, that's not -- it's not a good news. so the question is, well, why is this happening? we've had -- first we've had soft spots in the economy for the last two or three springs. might be another one of those. but you have had the payroll tax increase go into effect. you've had sequestration go into effect. you have no growth in people's incomes. that was the more disappointing numbers out of the last unemployment insurance report. and if people don't have money, they can't spend money. and finally, we're being affected in the slowdown in europe in particular and the slowdown in the emerging markets. our export growth has fallen to about zero at the moment because there isn't demand overseas for our products. so it feels like a little bit of a soft sp
for, because i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your future? we'll help you get there. of mild to moderate alzheimer's disease is exelon patch. now with more treatment options, exelon patch may improve overall function and cognition. your loved one can get a free 30-day trial. and you can have access to nurses. it does not change how the disease progresses. hospitalization, and rarely death, have been reported from wearing more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fall, loss of appetite or weight, application site redness, and urinary tract infection. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases or if patients weigh less than 110 pounds. people at risk for stomach ulcers who take certain other medicines should talk to their doctor as serious s
to recover from its biggest sell- off of the year. the initial drop began on news that china's economy closed last quarter. but the selling accelerated after reports flooded in about explosions at the boston mayor ton. >>> the dow sank 265 points, the biggest drop since november. the nasdaq lost 78 points. and for the second day in a row, commodities dropped on wall street. gold was down more than $200 in just two days. it stands at $1,360 an ounce. they're thinking cyprus and other weak countries could start selling their gold reserves. the slowdown in china pulled down the price of copper, crude oil closed at a four-month low. that finished at $89 a barrel. >>> expect corporate profit reports today from johnson&johnson, coca-cola, goldman sachs and u.s. bank corps. >>> two automakers are teaming up. general motors and ford will work together to develop a new generation of fuel efficient automatic transmissions. they'll develop 9 and 10-speed transmissions that will go into many of their new cars and trucks. >>> there are a lot of theories about what happened yesterday. for many it brought b
economy. monday's sell off was the worst day for sell offs in five months. gold too is bouncing back after pushing it's biggest drop in dollar terms. wall street will be focused on data that we are getting this morning. housing starts and industrial production along with earnings. yesterday the dow fell 265 points and the nasdaq lost 78 to close at 2,316. the futures are pointing to a higher open. back to you. >> if you are looking for ways to help the people of boston keep an eye out for scams. less than an hour after the explosions a susprecioicious tw account. twitter shut down at underscore boston marathon. websites have been set up and if you see anything spuspicious le us know on our facebook page. >> they are trying to figure out who planned those devices. chris is in boston for us with the latest. the race came to a violent end. two explosions near the finish line about 12 seconds and 100 yards apart sent runners for safety. the runners were going the other way. they were people running crying, the wounded were rushed to several boston hospitals. among the dead an 8-year-old boy. d
marathon runners and that has fostered culture and now, even a whole economy you wouldn't know existed unless you went looking. this is a runner named ambi burrfoot. he won the marathon in 1968. he was less than a mile from the finish yesterday when the explosions put there. it is hard to believe this attack targeted the marathon, but even if it was hit as a symbol of something else, it was hit in a way that mean it is world to a whole community of people who run. he wrote today in runners world, this wasn't just an attack against the marathon. it was our use of the streets. we have used our public roadways for annual parades, protest marchers, marathons and all over manner of events. the roads belong to us and their use represents a part of our free and democratic tradition. i trust and believe that will not change in the future. not in boston, not at the boston marathon and not in other important event. we cannot tent violent akts koent threaten our great institution, but our institutions did not become great by following a path of timidity and cowardess. we can only hope it will ris
the day of the bombings. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> i'm jake tapper live in boston. you're looking at live pictures of the crime scene with investigators going around the area. just recently president obama addressed the boston terrorist bombings on the south lawn during an event with the wounded warrior project. take a listen to that. >> you know, we obviously meet at a time when our thoughts and prayers are with the people of boston. our hearts are with the families of the victims and now we send our support and encouragement to people who never expected that they would need it, wounded civilians who are just beginning what will be i'm sure for some of them a long road to recovery. it is a road the remarkable warriors and athletes here know all too well. and as a consequences are going to serve for all of the families as well as all americans' continued inspiration. >> president obama will visit boston tomorrow. cnn will have full coverage of his arrival and the interfaith ceremony and
of the economy beginning, of course, with the subprime crisis, so that really added fuel to the fire, made people angry, afraid, concerned, feeling like the country they lived in was not the country they grew up in, and so on. i think those are the two main things. the debate that began about gun control i think clearly has raised the temperature even more. sirchlts we just spent the last half hour talking about the fabric of american society being woven even tighter in times of tragedy, but can't forget about the fact that there are certain pockets about deep dissatisfaction. >> we're on two tracks in this country. if you go back to when i was a kid or a young man, we're in a much better place now racially than we were back then. on the other hand you have a proliferation of these groups. because of the changing demographics, and that sort of thing. one of the things i'm curious about, though, is why this does not get more coverage in the media. i think this is an important trend in the society, very significant, mark's group monitors this stuff heavily, but does not get a lot of traction in the
the first quarter of this year. guns, immigration and the economy. i think congress can only handle maybe one or two issues of that, and as we saw right now they dropped the ball on guns. one of them didn't go through. >> what is the fallout on guns? what happens? the president -- michael, he seemed to telegraph how he planned on campaigning on this. he used this issue in a campaign mode. the question i wonder is in a year is it still the same message? >> chuck, this goes back to the point i just made about immigration, that the opponents here have intensity and persistence. the supporters of gun control, they may feel strongly about it. maybe a certain intensity and historically what happens, that support, it fades, whereas the opposition remains intent called preference intensity is a really important thing that drives what happens in washington. i think that, you know, one reason that people who did not want to support gun control opposed this kind of general cultural sense, a signifier for where you are on cultural issues. where do you come down on certain -- i think for the president
for the u.s. economy. dramatically.at we discovered our immigration system had failed. a number of these individuals should have been allowed into the united states. there was a lot soul-searching about how to correct these problems. the number of visitors to the united states went down dramatically. we have put in place systems in terms oftty good screening. we're trying to have the best of both worlds. we want to encourage people to come to our country. we want to be able to keep up those who are likely to do was this kind of harm. it is a balancing act. the perfect from becoming the enemy of the good? guest: in an open country like the united states, we always have been, you cannot have perfect security. it doesn't mean you cannot do better. host: denver from new mexico. from mexico. caller: i would like to make a comment about the borders. terroristic camps popping up everywhere. again and ages form in these other places that is hard to reach. they are training on the mexico sied states. they are, across our borders -- they are coming across our borders. they are getting aro
currently in our country illegally. many have been here for years and contributing to our economy. knowing who they are is critical to public safety. it must be evidence from the outset there is a pathway to citizenship that will be fair and a tenable. .- fair and attainable dreamers and immigrant farm workers will also be included. those who complete the requirements will be able to achieve lawful status more quickly. the bill will improve our legal immigration system. visas.ses the cap on thes it continues to protect vulnerable immigrants. it creates new temporary worker programs while protecting american workers. businesses must be able to maintain a stable legal workforce if our economy is to continue to grow. this will pressure on the border and reduce illegal flows. the majority of americans support these common sense steps. we are ready to implement them. we can and we will achieve the core provisions of the bill. we stand ready to work with the congress to achieve this important goal. the introduction of this legislation is indeed a milestone. i look forward to continue to working
see in europe, a different picture, but an economy under pressure there. imf cut forecasts. there's a broad based selloff, 147 names of the s&p 500 with down arrows. the defensive names trying to squeeze out up arrow, but i wanted to look here at apple, a new low, new 52-week low. last september, $705. and now it's $403. selling off significantly, more than 40% from the september highs. latest report is from digi times about the report that ipad minis are not getting the orders or shipping the way they hoped origin thally. obviously, under pressure there for apple as well. back to you. dennis: thanks very much, nicole. rich edson has the latest at the white house with the suspicious packages in washington. rich? >> two senate aids told us messages they got from the u.s. capitol police department. there is one suspicious package in the atrium of the heart office building and suspicious envelope on the third floor of the senate building, and russell building, a suspicious envelope on the third floor. these are across the capitol building housing senate and committee staff. they are
this policy. which inn facts is always a good policy. a prime money laundering concern. the entire economy is a prime money laundering concern. the famous subject on the banks of delta asia and macau which tracked down successfully kim's own money, that's the father, nearby dandong is the port of dal lifment on. recently a couple years back, the south africans found one of these ships as it came into a south african port filled with chinese rice and wheat and north korean weaponry of all kinds. it obviously had been inspected in dalleon and had been oked for onward proliferation to north korea. let's look at a couple more statistics. their exports to china has quadrupled during this period of 2008 to 2011 of strategic patients and tough financial sanctions and what have you and various u.n. resolution and so on and so forth. so trade may have doubled. according to bun of the prime watchers of north korean economics external and interm, north korean may in fact be running a trade surplus, which i think would shock a lot of people for any poor country. meaning it is exporting capital. north
for inviting me today. the postal service plays an incredible role in the american economy it provides a national platform that every business and president relies on in the directly supports and 800 billion-dollar manning industry that employs 8 million people. america needs a financially healthy postal service. it needs a service that can adapt to changes and technology and the habits of american consumers. it needs a postal service that inspires confidence in the future. today the postal service faces tremendous financial challenge its ss model is not flexible and the future we lack the authority t fulfil our responsibilities to the great nation. unfortately bill all that controls the actions do not provthoryo t flexibility for it to continue as a self sustaining organization. we simply lack the tools under the law to solve the problems we face. if we are giving authority and the flexibility to quickly address our problems, we will do so. the board is directed to the management of the postal service exports and act upon every opportunity to generate new revenue and reduce cost. post
can live with that. many people believe this will make our information and economy quite safer. is a: catherine lotrionte professor at georgetown university and has been talking to us about cyber security and privacy. thank you for being on the program. guest: thank you. host: coming up, we will talk about an investigation into the gaps and oversight of compound pharmacies. today is saturday, april 20. we will be right back. >> i strongly urge you to come up with a number that tells this committee and the american people -- we have a responsibility as well. for you to say, we're just going to see how things turn out, he will determine the size of the 2014 force, i believe is a tragic and terrible this date for which we may pay a very heavy price -- mistake for which we may pay a very heavy price. tosenator, i didn't say leave it completely vague. we are advising and assisting at the battalion level. were going to lift off at the brigade level this fall. the 2014 number is inextricably linked to the number we believe we need to provide to assist post 2014. >> you have to wait till 201
in the current state of the economy. this is from fall of 2012. we will see if that changes post-boston and if those numbers go up. this goes to the earlier segment that you aired, this idea that the united states is complacent with respect to terrorism. i think the survey demonstrates it is among the things that iople think about your it also think that the law enforcement community is certainly not complacent when it comes to terrorism. the boston event was a security event. there's a lot of individuals covering that event, from federal, state and local. i don't think that boston happened due to complacency. i don't think we necessarily are complacent. i think we have accepted terrorism as a new facet of our reality, albeit one that does not happen that frequently. host: if you want to look at the start.u you can go to m.d.edd.edu to get more informa. nationaliff, from the consortium for the study of terrorism & responses to terrorism. caller: good morning. i think these turbo crimes are quite separate. two crimes are quite separate. the man in connecticut was concerning his di
it. >> in 1839, britain, at the moment it controls more of the world economy than it will ever do before or since, about 40% of world trade, go in and invades afghanistan. looks as if it's going to be incredibly easy. >> always does, doesn't it? >> they walk in as with many other subsequent invasions, looks as if everything's going to go very easy. within a few months they are busy ice skating. they brought their fox hounds. they've come up with 30 camels full of -- they brought three camels with cigars. one camel just carrying eau du cologne for the troops. all looks easy. within 18 months the most incredible jihad has been declared. the troops are completely surrounded. because they walked in so easily they haven't made any fortifications. they're surrounded on all sides by hills. the afghans capture their food and ammunition within about 48 hours. they shoot the deputy governor at the uprising. the main governor goes out to negotiate. he gets shot dead. you have a completely lead to this army without food, without ammunition in the middle of winter. all they can do is retreat.
helps write the next chapter in american history by reinrigvating our economy and the kind of country that attracted my maternal grandparents. >> that hearing is still going on at the moment. meanwhile, some republicans like senators chuck grassley and jeff sessions have started wondering allowed whether we should slow down immigration reform in the wake of last week's marathon bombers. just the opposite. we need to act more quickly to identify who is here and to use reform to toughen current regulations. >>> we're finding out today that neither of the boston bombing suspects was licensed to carry a gun. this according to the cambridge police department which says that 19-year-old dzhokhar tsarnaev was not old enough to apply for a license because he would have to be 21. the department has no record of 26-year-old tamerlan tsarnaev ever applying. massachusetts state law does say those under 21 can get a firearms i.d. card. they can own a shotgun or a rifle holding less than ten rounds but according to authorities, the two brothers had at least six bombs handguns, a rifle and more than
. that was other things happening around the world. the chinese economy was falling down, banks in cyprus potentially selling their gold reserves to pay to the european commission. a lot of things on minds when they open today. i'll tell you what's different today. this is the security tent. everyone that goes into the new york stock exchange has to go through that security at the present time. traders, heads of state, presidents. no one is immune from the security screen. as we come back and look around at the people that are starting to kind of get o work in lower manhattan, again, there is going to be increased security here at the new york stock exchange and increased security around manhattan. julie banderas reporting on changes to times square, train stations. any financial institutions in new york city and some have been targets in the past of terrorists. mayor bloomberg making sure today that 1,000 extra counterterrorism officers are on the streets of new york. many of them, again, going to be here in downtown manhattan and at the new york stock exchange. again, market is going to
i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your future? we'll help you get there. >>> welcome back to this special edition of "today" as we cover the aftermath of monday's bombings at the boston marathon. natalie is back with more on why this event means so much to this city. >> that's right, savannah, from many participants completing the race is a lifelong dream. it is known for its challenging hills and its enthusiastic crowds but this year it became the perfect target for terror. who could have predicted a race that began with the traditional starting gun would end with a pair of explosions. a city wide celebration transformed in an instant by an act of terrorism. >> everybody was excited, taking pictures and next thing you know it's just utter chaos. we were terrified and the only thing we could think of, is there another bomb? >> it
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)